This is the list of courses/projects we are sponsoring for the 2016-17 school year. We hope you enjoy participating in them.

Students learn all about the eclipse of the sun when it happens on November 14. Students and teachers from around the world share information about the solar eclipse and discuss this information by commenting on each other’s web pages. They will make special eclipse glasses to safely view an eclipse of the sun.

On August 21, 2017, there will be a major Solar Eclipse that is visible from Portland to Florida.  The iCollaboratory will be looking at it in Kentucky. 

Students read Every Soul a Star to learn about a Solar Eclipse. Book is written in English.

Part of our China Exchange, TheMoon Over Us: Moon Phases and Faces is where students learn about moon phases and faces. They learn how the moon looks when viewed from the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In the project, students and teachers from around the world share and discuss their poetry, stories, drawings, images and videos of the moon's different looks by commenting on each other's web pages.

The Moon Over Us: Moon Phases is where students learn more about the moon phases and their effect on Earth.  In the project, students and teachers from around the world share information, history, stories, images, drawings and video  about the moon phases and discuss this information by commenting on each other's web pages.

Part of our China Exchange, The Moon Over Us: Moon Faces is where students learn about moon faces. They learn how the moon looks when viewed from the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. In the project, students and teachers from around the world share and discuss their poetry, stories, drawings, images and videos of the moon's different looks by commenting on each other's web pages.

April 1-May 1 (Grades K-12)
Whether it be a sonnet or a cinquain, we encourage students to share their literary work and discuss it with one another.

This project is funded by International Astronomical Union (IAU) is the the Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) in partnership with the South African National Research Foundation.)

Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students can measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth.

This project meets standards for Math, Science, Reading and Geography.

Students receive buttons for each activity.


Did you ever go on a really great field trip and then want to tell everyone about your visits? Use this project to share your fantastic field trip experiences!